David Bull Publishing

On the Road With Luca Dal Monte, Enzo Ferrari and the New York Times

David BullComment

Luca Dal Monte, author of our new biography "Enzo Ferrari: Power, Politics, and the Making of an Automotive Empire" is the subject of a recent profile in the New York Times. In addition to covering Luca's life, career, and experience writing the book, the article also features a sprint through the back roads of Westchester County in a rare 1966 Ferrari 275 GTB.

Thanks to writer Jamie Kitman and the Times for recognizing this epic biography and revealing the time, effort, and exhaustive research that went into it. Like a classic Ferrari car, the book is a unique combination of passion, attention to detail, and Italian craftsmanship.

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https://www.nytimes.com/2018/04/25/books/book-enzo-ferrari-car-luca-dal-monte.html?rref=collection%2Fsectioncollection%2Fbooks&action=click&contentCollection=books®ion=rank&module=package&version=highlights&contentPlacement=2&pgtype=sectionfront

Ferrari's Finale, 1931

Tracy MooreComment

To mark the launch of Enzo Ferrari: Power, Politics, and the Making of an Automotive Empire, we're sharing images from the 968-page book's four sections of photographs.

Keep following the David Bull Publishing Blog and our Facebook and Twitter pages for more images and excerpts from this epic biography.

  Enzo Ferrari's driving career ended in August, 1931 at Italy's Circuit of the Three Provinces, where he drove an Alfa Romeo 8C to a second-place finish behind the great Tazio Nuvolari, his Scuderia Ferrari teammate. At the end of the race the winner genuinely and sincerely praised the runner-up. "In order to beat you," Tazio told Enzo that afternoon, "I had to work harder than I've ever done before."

Enzo Ferrari's driving career ended in August, 1931 at Italy's Circuit of the Three Provinces, where he drove an Alfa Romeo 8C to a second-place finish behind the great Tazio Nuvolari, his Scuderia Ferrari teammate. At the end of the race the winner genuinely and sincerely praised the runner-up. "In order to beat you," Tazio told Enzo that afternoon, "I had to work harder than I've ever done before."

Remembering Dan Gurney, 1931-2018

David BullComment

Like everyone else in the motorsports community we are mourning the loss of legendary driver, car builder, and innovator Dan Gurney, who died last Sunday at age 86. 

Dan's legacy is almost too rich and varied to summarize succinctly.  As a driver he scored multiple victories in Formula One, Indy Cars, and NASCAR, along with major sports-car wins at Sebring, the Nurburgring, and Le Mans.  In 1965 he partnered with Carroll Shelby to launch All American Racers, whose Eagle cars would compete successfully in F1, Indy Car racing and other series for decades.

Dan was also a longtime friend of David Bull Publishing.  In 2007 he worked closely with author John Zimmermann to produce Dan Gurney's Eagle Racing Cars. He also contributed a foreword to that book and several others. Most recently Dan was one of six drivers and team managers to autograph the Publisher's Edition of our 2016 book Trans-Am Era.

Our condolences and best wishes go out to Dan's wife Evi, and the rest of the Gurney family.

 

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Dan Gurney aboard his own All American Racers Formula One car before the 1966 British Grand Prix at Brands Hatch.  The photo is from David Bull Publishing's 2013 book McLaren From the Inside: Photographs by Tyler Alexander.

New Enzo Ferrari book sneak peek!

David Bull

Coming Spring 2018:  Enzo Ferrari—Power, Politics, and the Making of an Automotive Empire

To members of the media, recipients of my Twitter posting, and to our readers interested in a “look behind the scenes” of how our books are created, published, and reviewed, this is a quick overview dealing with those points. They were referred to in a Twitter post I sent out that went beyond the individuals to whom they were intended (I’m still getting the hang of this Twitter business). I thought it a good idea to explain the terms I used and why they are relevant or important to us.

Luca and I appreciate your interest in his definitive biography of Enzo Ferrari. As you read the book you will not be surprised to learn it was a near decade-long effort to research and write, and you will find it remarkable that Luca had the stamina to produce his book. It boasts an academic rigor and commitment to historical accuracy that  any serious historian would envy. Those characteristics are complemented by beautiful, lyrical writing and remarkably vivid depictions of events that at times seem almost poetic.  

Additionally, Luca goes to great lengths to provide the sources of his information—the proof in the pudding—so you, the reader, are never asked to take his word for a fact. The sources are always provided. Each chapter concludes with numbered endnotes providing those sources.

Endnotes are basically the same as footnotes, but are located at the end of each chapter rather than the bottom of each page. From a design perspective they make for even page lengths. These notes provide the sources of the information, such as the newspaper or magazine in which a report apppeared, or the name of the individual who provided the information.

Most indexes simply list a subject and the page on which that subject appears. Annotated indexes list categories within the subjects rather than a plain list of page numbers. This is helpful for the reader looking to find information quickly and accurately. For researchers, this is terribly important because they can find precisely what they are looking for and they can do so quickly, without the frustration of hunting through scores of pages looking for their specific subject. The annotated index was not a part of the original Italian edition. In fact, that edition had no index of any kind.

This biography actually began life as a project between Luca and David. In the end, Luca decided it would be advantageous to publish in Italy first, where it quickly became a best-seller.  

The English edition produced by David and Luca, has additional details and elements not found in the Italian edition. These include a foreword by Luca di Montezemolo, chapter endnotes citing all sources of information, and an annotated index, assembled with precision and specificity essential for efficient research. This book is alive with the spirit of Modena, Milan, and Maranello, as well as the the drivers who raced for Enzo, and of course, is brought to life by the author’s definitive presentation of Enzo himself.

Members of the media are encouraged to email David Bull for more information. Those interested in reviewing the book should also contact David with their pertinent information to request one of the few soft cover advance copies available now. These copies are very limited. For qualified media contacts unable to receive advance copies, a hardcover review copy will be sent as soon as they are available.